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Pupil Premium

Please read the information below which gives details of our Pupil Premium funding and how we allocate it.

If you would like a modified or enlarged paper copy of any of the documents below,  please do not hesitate to contact the administration team in the school office.

What is it?

The pupil premium is funding allocated to schools for the specific purpose of boosting the attainment of pupils from low-income families. Funding is based on children who have registered for a free school meal at any point in the last 6 years, children that are in care or adopted and children whose parents are currently serving in the armed forces.

 

Why has it been introduced?

The Government believes that the Pupil Premium, which is additional to main school funding, is the best way to address the current underlying inequalities between disadvantaged children and their peers by ensuring that funding to tackle disadvantage reaches the pupils who need it most. Whilst schools are free to spend the Pupil Premium as they see fit we are required to publish this online.

For the academic year September 2016 to July 2017 St James’ CofE Junior School received £180,440 of Pupil Premium funding and St James’ CofE Infant School received £39,600.

For the current academic year September 2017 to July 2018 St James’ CofE Junior School will receive £150,480 of Pupil Premium funding and St James’ CofE Infant School will receive £39,600. The percentage of our pupils known to be eligible for free school meals is 38% in St James’ Juniors and 27% in St James’ Infants the national percentage is 26%.

 

What are our main barriers to disadvantaged children's progress?

  • Ensuring they all receive consistently high quality personalised teaching and learning.

  • Children's independence, resilience, confidence and vocabulary.

  • Parental engagement and pupil attendance.

  • Access to a wide variety of life experiences and extra curricular activities.

 

What are we spending our Pupil Premium on this year?

  • Additional teaching staff, higher level teaching assistants and interventions.

  • Raised awareness and pupil tracking.

  • Improved provision and inclusion for vulnerable children.

  • Strategies to improve parental engagement and pupil attendance.

  • Increased access to a wider variety of experiences and extra curricular activities.

 

See Action Plans below for more details.

 

Summary of Outcomes 2017

 

 

School Results 2017

National Results 2017

Disadvantaged children

Non disadvantaged children

Non disadvantaged children

Foundation Stage

 

 

 

Good Level of Development

50%

58%

72%

Key Stage 1 Phonics

 

 

 

Year 1 Phonics Pass

86%

64%

83%

Year 2 Phonics Pass

75%

89%

93%

Key Stage 1

 

 

 

RWM Expected Standard

%

%

64%

Reading Expected Standard

67%

61%

79%

Writing Expected Standard

50%

56%

72%

Maths Expected Standard

75%

61%

79%

Reading Greater Depth

8%

33%

28%

Writing Greater Depth

0%

44%

18%

Maths Greater Depth

8%

39%

23%

Key Stage 2

 

 

 

RWM Expected Standard

48%

60%

67%

Reading Expected Standard

58%

63%

77%

Writing Expected Standard

73%

70%

81%

Maths Expected Standard

73%

70%

80%

EGPS Expected Standard

68%

77%

82%

Reading Higher Standard

8%

20%

29%

Writing Greater Depth

3%

3%

21%

Maths Higher Standard

13%

10%

27%

EGPS Higher Standard

10%

7%

36%

Reading Progress

0.1

0.4

0.3

Writing Progress

0.9

0.2

0.2

Maths Progress

2.8

2.1

0.3

Attendance

 

 

 

Attendance

 

 

96%

Persistent Absentees > 10%

 

 

8.7%

 

Early Years Foundation Stage

In 2017 disadvantaged children did not do as well as non disadvantaged children. However, over the past 3 years disadvantaged children's outcomes have improved from 17% in 2014, diminishing the difference to national non disadvantaged children.

 

Year 1 Phonics

In 2017 disadvantaged children did better than non disadvantaged children in school and better than non disadvantaged children locally and nationally.

 

Key Stage 1

Disadvantaged children did better than non disadvantaged children in reading and maths at the Expected Standard and they did better than disadvantaged children both locally and nationally, showing that they continue to diminish the difference towards national non disadvantaged children. Disadvantaged children did not do as well as non disadvantaged children working at the Greater Depth Standard.

 

Key Stage 2

Disadvantaged children did better than non disadvantaged children in writing and maths at the Expected Standard and did better than disadvantaged children both locally and nationally at the Expected Standard in all subjects. Disadvantaged children did better than non disadvantaged children in grammar, punctuation and spelling and maths at the Higher Standard and did better than local and national disadvantaged children in maths at the Higher Standard.

Progress rates for disadvantaged children are better than national progress rates for non disadvantaged children in writing and maths. This together with an improvement in progress and attainment for disadvantaged children when compared to 2016, shows that school's strategies are successfully diminishing the gap to national non disadvantaged averages.

 

Attendance

The gap between disadvantaged children and non-disadvantaged children nationally continues to close.

St James' CofE Junior School Pupil Premium Planners

Further Information about Pupil Premium Funding
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